Gasoline & Diesel Prices

 

Good afternoon,

 

Gasoline Prices are up today by 2.6 cents. Diesel fuel prices are up 2.9 cents. Prices are:

            

AV.RACK

FEDERAL

STATE

SPILL

COST

   PRODUCT

  PRICE

  TAX

TAX

TAX

With Tax

UL REG

2.2908

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.7822

PREMIUM

2.4705

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.9619

ULS

2.3874

0.2440

0.3055

0.0019

2.9388

ULS RD

2.3850

0.0000

0.0025

0.0019

2.3894

 

Have a good weekend,

 

-Larry H.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

 

You can view gasoline/diesel price changes at any time on our website at www.hopkinsoil.com but you must first Logon to see them

Larry Hopkins

President

Hopkins Oil Co. Inc.

5211 Trademark Drive

Raleigh, N.C. 27610

Direct Line: 919-534-2309

Cell: 919-622-8205

Fax: 919-833-8122

larry@hopkinsoil.com

 

A Tribute to My Dad

 

A Tribute to T. A. “Mack” Hopkins

Do you remember where you were when you heard that a great man had died?  I was on my way to the airport to pick up my sister, Karen, who was flying in from Philadelphia. I received a call that our father was dying. “Come now!” We were four minutes too late. It wasn’t like it was a surprise to anyone. The arrow had left the bow weeks before. We just didn’t know when it would land. He made it through the thirty-five radiation treatments just after Christmas. The lung cancer was gone. He was back walking within a week of the first stroke in min-January, though with the aid of a walker. I remember a sunny day in February when he and Mackenzie, his four year old granddaughter, were sitting on the tailgate of his truck, chiding, equally, the joggers and the old man with the cane, “Pick it up there!” My wife, Terri, and I chose the name Mackenzie partially because it had “Mack” in it. Dad liked that. He was always good with kids.

Life either breaks a person or it shapes their character. He had every excuse to fail. He never got the chance to go to college as my three sisters and I did. His father had been one of the  biggest farmers in Wake County until the Great Depression hit. Dad told me stories of life of breaking green mules, of clearing land of stumps with a team of mules, of helping to take a column of a dozen wagons to town, loaded with crops his family had harvested. He would laugh as he remembered being chased across a pasture by their old bull, of trying to ride the bull bareback, and how the bull’s skin would roll under him. If all else failed, the bull would take off through some sapling pines, in an attempt to knock him off. He got in a lot of fights, sometimes going to school, sometimes coming home. He loved baseball. He played first base. He kept his uniform in a trunk in the atic.

He told me about staying up all night to feed a wood fire to ‘cure out’ a barn of tobacco. He always said that the tobacco these days just isn’t as good. That in his time, you could smell the aroma of the tobacco riding down the road in the evenings when all the doors were open, airing out of the barns. His father died when he was twenty. That was the year he graduated from high school. All of their family farms were sold at auction and the sheriff came and evicted his mother, him, his five brothers, and his four sisters from house. They moved to another, smaller farm and became renters. Dad drove a school bus in high school. He was voted most likely to succeed by his classmates.

My dad knew from his own life that what ‘things’ a person owns, is not the measure of a man. He measured others as he measured himself, in how hard they worked, in how they provided for his family, in a firm hand shake, and whether a person keeps his word. He always told me “It never cost you anything to be nice to people”. And time after time, whether it was a personal or a business problem, he would say ” I want to do what is right”. With his customers, he would always ask ‘Is there any way I can help you?”

At 23 years old he married my mother, Estelle Pearce, six days before Christmas in 1936. They went to Louisburg on their honeymoon.  It was all they could afford. They have since celebrated 60 anniversaries together. Dad took a job with a local bakery for a while, driving a bread truck. He quit the bread route and took a job with Raleigh City Coach in 1942 driving a bus. In 1945 he began his oil business on the side. He bought a pickup with a 275 gallon tank on the back and a gasoline pump and became a commissioned driver with Sinclair Oil. He had never smoked much, but in 1950 he decided he just didn’t need it. He put his pack of Luckies on the mantelpiece and left them there until they rotted.

Neither of my parents cared much for whiners. One of my earliest memories was falling off the top of my dad’s first oil truck onto the pavement. After gently washing my cuts with a damp cloth and ‘shoosh, you’re alright”, my mother said, “You shouldn’t have been up there in the first place!” In other words, take responsibility for your actions. My dad had a hard time obtaining that first truck. He had it figured out. If he could get the truck before the curing season started then he could pay for it in the Fall when the farmer’s paid him. He had tried the banks and all turned him down. He went to Raleigh Tractor & Truck. The owner was John Alexander, Sr. and to him, Dad explained his situation. Dad said Mr. Alexander didn’t say anything for the longest time and he was sure that the answer was “no”. Finally, John Alexander said, “Yes, Mack. I will let you have the truck”. They shook on it and were friends ever since.  I remember our backyard that summer was full of 275 gallon oil drums for tobacco barns. I remember I walked back and forth on them like a trained bear.

Dad delivered oil in the mornings, starting when the plant opened at 7:30, and worked until early afternoon when he would hurry home, grab lunch, and go drive the second shift for the bus company. After midnight, some warm nights when the windows were up, I would hear him slip quietly in through the back door. His bus route took him out Hillsborough Street to Meredith College where he turned around to come back. Meredith “was in the woods back then and sometimes I was so tired it was all I could do to keep the bus under the street lights”. (I was amazed to learn that his nickname  “Mack” was from a lazy uncle that my Dad reminded people of as a boy!) He met many people while driving the bus and many of them became his heating oil customers and his friends. He had not Equifax or TRW back then. Whether he gave them credit or not largely depended on where they work and who they were kin to. His friendship for Jesse Helms started back then, when Senator Helms was a reporter for the Raleigh Times. Mr. Helms would often ride the bus around town while collecting his stories, but when he got off work at 1:00 or 2:00 in the morning, he had to try to catch  a ride home. Failing that he would have to ‘thumb’ back to Wake Forest where he lived. In hearing the two of them talk, one can understand their absolute disgust for people who do not try to help themselves but expect government to take care of them. Knowing my Dad’s conservative views, imagine my amazement to find out that, not only was he in the bus driver’s union but he was the elected representative who ‘had to sit down and negotiate the labor contracts with the best lawyers that Carolina Power & Light had. You had to dot every I and cross every t.” He explained it this way: “when I was driving a bus, we expected a fair wage for a fair day’s work. Today, these bus drivers demand to be paid from the time that they leave home. We only expected to be paid when we were working”. He worked six days a week and on the seventh day we went to church, sometimes twice. If a customer gave out of heating oil in the middle of the night, he would get out of his bed and take them some oil. Years later, I often wondered that our neighbors never complained about the oil truck sitting in our drive. I certainly wouldn’t try that in Cary today or most parts of Raleigh. Our closest neighbor was an imminent surgeon. He parked his Cadillac under the paved carport and my Dad parked his oil truck on our side of the hedge in our gravel driveway. Some kids seemed ashamed of what their father’s did for a living. That was a thought that would never have occurred to me. When another kid or a teacher asked me what my father’s occupation was, I would reply, ‘He’s an oil jobber”. It was kind of fun to watch them trying to work out exactly what that was. Then I would add, “and he drives a city bus”, and they would smile and go ‘Oh!”. In 1962, he had enough confidence to quit his night job and devote all of his time to the oil business. When it came time for me do a little work, there was never any question about what that work would be. At fifteen, when I got my learner’s permit, he told me to climb get in the oil truck and drive. Now I had ‘trucked’ tobacco for two summers driving a farm tractor, but I still was a little apprehensive. “Look!” he said, “You’re not going to learn any younger. Let’s go!” Who could argue with that reasoning.

In May, 1972, Dad bought the bulk plant from BP, the oil company that had bought out Sinclair on the East Coast three years earlier. Atlantic Richfield got the western half of Sinclair including the credit card center. “Somebody went to sleep on that deal”, Dad said. He acquired a Texaco distributorship  when Modern Oil sold out to Sunoco/Midstate Oil Co. He had to borrow money but he never liked it, for obvious reasons. But on risk he always said “a scared solar won’t make you one cent”. He continued to work and build on the brand and his own name until 1989 when he decided it was time for him to sell me the business. He said “Larry, I have four children of which you are one, so I cannot give you the business but I will give you one fourth off. I was to make monthly payments with interest. It took me eleven years to pay off the debt. Dad worked on with me the first two years. “Serving without pay” was his term for it. He was bored so at 78 he started Hopkins Propane and he put on a clinic on how to do a startup company. Every month I would see another tractor trailer load of tanks coming in the drive. But after a time he began to suffer from a short term memory loss. They never called it Alzheimer’s. He was treated for two years at the Duke Center for Memory Disorders. On advice of the doctor, he could no longer drive a vehicle. He hated that more than anything, that loss of freedom. I wonder how many million miles he drove in his lifetime? During one of his Duke visits, after failing a simple memory test by the Doctor, Dad told the Doctor off, “But  I DO remember! I know that you are Dr. Alberts and you’re and expert and you think you’re smarter than EVERYBODY else!” I know this to be true because my Dad remembered to tell me about it later, and he laughed out loud when he said it. We sold the Hopkins Propane Co. to Ferrell Gas and he was justly proud of the settlement.

The Sunday night before his second stroke, I sat listening to my wife, Terri, reading Dad’s Sunday school lesson to him. After she finished, she asked him if he was worried about anything or depressed? He said “No, I’m not. I feel good about my life. I feel that God has blessed me. Every night I thank God for my life and his blessings. We all should.”

The next day, the second stroke sent him back to the hospital again. He could not walk. Even in the face of blood thinners, a painful phlebitis followed in his legs, then multiple strokes after that. It was like watching the Cheshire Cat in Alice in Wonderland where one part of the body disappeared, one piece at a time. He lost the use of his left arm, then his right. Then he could no longer talk. My sisters and I took turns sitting up nights with him as did my uncle and one of Dad’s friends from his Sunday school class. My mother sat with him all day every day for five weeks. One of those nights when he could still talk, he asked my sister, Beverly, “I’m not going to get any better, am I?”Another night he told my wife, Terri, that “Mackenzie is the light of my heart”. Terri was able to share with him that she was carrying a son, to carry on his family name. Every night I would leave the hospital after visiting hour were over, and I could look up in the sky and could see a comet quite clearly, without the aid of a telescope. It is said that comets always foretell of great events. In the end, he could no longer see, but I am sure that he heard. My nights alone with him in the hospital, I told him all that was in my heart. I suspect we all did. We tried everything, medically, there was to tray and when there was nothing left to do, we brought him home to stay. He fought the good fight. He finished the course. We buried him in the rain on his birthday, April 28th, 1997. He would have been 84 years old Thomas Alson Hopkins or ‘Mack” to his friends: he was brother, husband, father, grandfather and “Mack” to many. Those places he filled in our lives are now empty . he will be missed. I miss him. Mackenzie asked me, “Is Grandpa with the “Angels?” Yes. He is.

Gasoline & Diesel Price Changes

 

Good morning,

 

Prices of gasoline are down 2.7 cents today. Diesel fuel at the average rack in Selma is down 3/10ths of a cent:

AV.RACK

FEDERAL

STATE

SPILL

COST

   PRODUCT

  PRICE

  TAX

TAX

TAX

With Tax

UL REG

2.2644

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.7558

PREMIUM

2.4439

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.9353

ULS

2.3577

0.2440

0.3055

0.0019

2.9091

ULS RD

2.3550

0.0000

0.0025

0.0019

2.3594

 

On a day when the Dow dropped 213 points, the stock of Goldman Sachs went up $1, even with the Senate hearings going on. Apparently, many of Goldman Sachs’ clients were so outraged with the lynch mob mentally of the hearings that they called and pledged even more business. In one example of the eleven hour exchange and grilling that went on, the incident that was on all the news where the Senator asked the Goldman representative about an e-mail that mentioned a certain business deal that was a “piece of shit”, the Senator never gave the man a chance to explain. What he was trying to say before was rudely cut off was, that if it were a piece of shit then the buyer would have seen that and priced it like a piece of shit. The buyers dealing with Goldman are not homeowners, they are sophisticated traders. It would be like selling a clunker to an experienced car salesman who would know a clunker when he saw one and would price his purchase price accordingly.

What they need to do is break up these big conglomerates into vertical, agile operating units. When the CEO of Merrill Lynch heard about the mortgage crisis, he had to ask his mortgage unit how many they had bought. That’s when he found out Merrill was bankrupt. He had no clue what was going on. Just like Wells Fargo/Wachovia they have a commercial banking division, an investment bank, they have a mortgage division, a stock brokerage division, a leasing section, etc. One could conceive of how a family could invest their stock with Wells Fargo, buy their mortgage on their house from them, put your savings and checking in their bank and if Wells Fargo went belly up, the family could lose every dollar they had earned. I say break these conglomerates up and send the stock holders five or six shares of stock, one share for each division. Then none of these units would be too big to fail and they would be more competitive and move more quickly in their markets. The CEO would actually know his division that he heads and could make intelligent investments in the future of his stock holders.  Break up CITI, Bank of America and all the too big to fail and this would solve the problem.

 

No, our Senators are just playing to the crowd and voters this Fall and doing nothing useful which will solve the problem.

 

Best regards,

 

-Larry H.

 

 

You can view gasoline/diesel price changes at any time on our website at http://hopkinsoil.com/ but you must first Logon to see them

Larry Hopkins

President                                                                                                                                    

Hopkins Oil Co. Inc.

5211 Trademark Drive

Raleigh, N.C. 27610

Direct Line: 919-534-2309

Cell: 919-622-8205

Fax: 919-833-8122

larry@hopkinsoil.com

 

 

 

 

 

A Simple Idea on Healthcare

 

After my cataract surgery, one of my c-store dealers e-mailed me and asked if I had gotten any ideas from the surgery about Healthcare. The short answer is ‘No”, at least not new. Forty years ago I was in Pharmacy School at UNC and that summer I was working in John Treadwell’s Person Street Pharmacy. A lady came in with a welfare prescription for 500 mg. of Tetracycline. I filled it. The next day she came back with another prescription from another doctor for 500mg. of Tetracycline. I called the doctor and he cancelled the second prescription. As I learned more about drug contraindications, I saw what was needed was a way to catch them before they were filled. People may go to several different doctors and the doctors whether an internist, heart doctor, urologists, etc and these doctors are never sure what drugs the other physicians may have prescribed. That’s why one ends up filling out all those forms over and over. I concluded that all of the pharmacies in the country should be linked together with each patient’s medical history and the drugs they were taking. The software would check for any contraindications. An example of a drug contraindications might be heparin, a blood thinner, and simple aspirin. Heparin is bound up by albumin in the blood, leaving only a limited amount to thin the blood. If one takes aspirin it competes for the site on the albumin, freeing up more heparin resulting in an inability to clot.

Anyway, the idea was to create one “Source” computer that was would contain the newest knowledge on all drugs on the market. This is important because it was always said as a joke, that one could look at the books a pharmacist has on the shelf and you would know what year the pharmacist graduated. In other words the youngest pharmacist would have the most up to date knowledge but, unless they kept reading and studying, their knowledge was like a stop action photograph. “The Source’ that all the computers would access would be located at one of the premiere pharmacy schools in the country and this school would have the responsibility for updating all knowledge on drugs. This school would immediately attract the finest faculty and students and would become world famous. I mailed the idea to Jim Goodnight at SAS, and unbelievably to me, he wrote me back. He said it was a good idea but he did not think government would spend the money. I still have the letter.

This was 15 years before the Internet and the personal computer which would make it much easier to implement today. It is still a good idea and we could widen the field to include all doctors, pharmacists, etc. and put everyone’s health history on line. With health insurance companies required to accept any preexisting conditions, there should be little problem. If one were brought into an emergency room, the doctors could immediately access the information they need to make informed decisions on treatment by your name or health card. One might even carry a barcode on a bracelet for example. One can see, though, how life insurance companies would be a problem.

Just a side note. I took a drug manufacturing course in the pharmacy school and we were supposed to come up with a unique idea or product. I chose as my project, tablets of acetaminophen. One had to get the granuals to a precise size so the punches could mash them into tablets of the exact dose and that the tablets would be smooth and not come apart.  When I was home later, my sister Beverly mentioned she had a headache.  Naturally, I pulled out my tablets of Acetaminophen and offered them to her. ‘Like I would take some drug that Larry mixed up in a lab,’ she told my Mom. Not long after that, Johnson & Johnson came out  with a new product that they named Tylenol. Acetaminophen was actually manufactured for Tylenol at Mallinckrodt in North Raleigh. I have delivered drums of lube oils to their maintenance shop.

U.S. News and World Report lists UNC as the #2 Pharmacy School in the country (2009).

 

Best regards,

 

-Larry

 

You can view gasoline/diesel price changes at any time on our website at www.hopkinsoil.com but you must first Logon to see them

Larry Hopkins

President

Hopkins Oil Co. Inc.

5211 Trademark Drive

Raleigh, N.C. 27610

Direct Line: 919-534-2309

Cell: 919-622-8205

Fax: 919-833-8122

larry@hopkinsoil.com

Gasoline & Diesel Fuel Price Changes

 

Good Monday morning,

 

We have another week in Paradise. Gasoline jumped up 5.3 cents. Diesel fuel is up 3.9 cents at the average rack in Selma:

 

AV.RACK

FEDERAL

STATE

SPILL

COST

   PRODUCT

  PRICE

  TAX

TAX

TAX

With Tax

UL REG

2.3012

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.7926

PREMIUM

2.4728

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.9642

ULS

2.3712

0.2440

0.3055

0.0019

2.9226

ULS RD

2.3672

0.0000

0.0025

0.0019

2.3716

 

Have a good week,

 

-Larry H.

 

You can view gasoline/diesel price changes at any time on our website at www.hopkinsoil.com but you must first Logon to see them

Larry Hopkins

President

Hopkins Oil Co. Inc.

5211 Trademark Drive

Raleigh, N.C. 27610

Direct Line: 919-534-2309

Cell: 919-622-8205

Fax: 919-833-8122

larry@hopkinsoil.com

Gasoline & Diesel Price Changes

 

Good Friday morning to you,

 

Gasoline prices edged up 6/10ths of a cent today. Diesel fuel went up by 4/10ths of a cent  at the average rack in Selma. Crude is down 37 cents to $83.33 at this time. Prices today are:

 

AV.RACK

FEDERAL

STATE

SPILL

COST

   PRODUCT

  PRICE

  TAX

TAX

TAX

With Tax

UL REG

2.2480

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.7394

PREMIUM

2.4195

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.9109

ULS

2.3322

0.2440

0.3055

0.0019

2.8836

ULS RD

2.3286

0.0000

0.0025

0.0019

2.3330

 

 

I have been reading again, a book entitled Freakanomics about a think tank of creative minds, organized to make money and file patents. But part of their time was spent on solving society’s problems. The central theme of the book was how creative ideas solved the world’s problems, not government intervention. The best example was the problem of horse manure in large cities in the late 1800’s which created a huge health problem. It was said that the manure was so deep at times that it was piled up on the side of the roads like snow that had been plowed. Rats bred by the legends on the feed left in the horse manure. Disease was rampant.

Those Brownstone walkups that we all admire were originally built to elevate the first floor buildings out of the dung, which seeped into basements. A meeting of large cities’ representatives in 1875 broke up early and in despair for a solution. Enter the invention of the motor car. This solved the problem.

 

One of the ideas presented was how to tackle global warming. They considered how volcanoes spewing sulfur into the air brought the temperature down. The eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia in1815 resulted in a year without summer as a dry fog of dust covered the world for a year. Price of grain increased by eight times. The failure of crops resulted in the greatest world-wide famine of the 19th century. It snowed in Washington, D.C. in June. Ice on lakes and rivers was observed as far south as Pennsylvania  in August. The temperature could jump up to 95 degrees during the day but plummet to below freezing at night.

These think tank guys have come to the conclusion that catastrophic effects of global warming are unlikely. Plants would grow much better in higher levels of carbon dioxide. But on the chance that a problem should occur, we should have a plan to cool the earth back down. They picked as the most likely method was mimicking a volcano eruption by injecting sulfur into the Stratosphere. They noted that oil companies have mountains of sulfur sitting around. They sketched out a delivery method using pumps and long hose suspended by balloons up into the Stratosphere with nozzle jets injecting sulfur into the air, creating a shield that would block the UV rays and cool the Earth. The method is controllable and reversible and they thought it would be good to test it. The amount of sulfur needed to accomplish this cooling is surprisingly small and the cost was estimated to be $433 million which is a fraction of what Al Gore is spending on his public awareness campaign.

 

I finished the book one night last week and got up in the morning to hear on the news that a the volcano in Iceland erupted spewing ash and dust into the air. Talk about a coincidence.

 

Have a good and safe weekend, Oh, and I have attached above my on solution for our energy problems for those of you who have not yet been bored with it.

 

-Larry H.

 

You can view gasoline/diesel price changes at any time on our website at www.hopkinsoil.com but you must first Logon to see them

Larry Hopkins

President

Hopkins Oil Co. Inc.

5211 Trademark Drive

Raleigh, N.C. 27610

Direct Line: 919-534-2309

Cell: 919-622-8205

Fax: 919-833-8122

larry@hopkinsoil.com

Gasoline & Diesel Price Changes

 

Good morning,

 

Gasoline prices are up by 1.4 cents today at the average rack in Selma. Diesel prices are up 3.6 cents. Prices are:

AV.RACK

FEDERAL

STATE

SPILL

COST

   PRODUCT

  PRICE

  TAX

TAX

TAX

With Tax

UL REG

2.2425

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.7339

PREMIUM

2.4147

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.9061

ULS

2.3280

0.2440

0.3055

0.0019

2.8794

ULS RD

2.3252

0.0000

0.0025

0.0019

2.3296

 

A pair of Canadian geese just walked past my window with two small babies. Amazing! Our office has more weeds than grass but they seem to find something to eat in them. There is a five acre pond behind our property.

 

Have a good day,

 

-Larry H.

 

 

You can view gasoline/diesel price changes at any time on our website at www.hopkinsoil.com but you must first Logon to see them

Larry Hopkins

President

Hopkins Oil Co. Inc.

5211 Trademark Drive

Raleigh, N.C. 27610

Direct Line: 919-534-2309

Cell: 919-622-8205

Fax: 919-833-8122

larry@hopkinsoil.com

Gasoline & Diesel Price Changes

 

Good morning,

 

Gasoline prices moved back up at the average rack (oil company) in Selma by 2.9 cents. Diesel fuel Diesel fuel went up 3.0 cents. Prices are:

 

AV.RACK

FEDERAL

STATE

SPILL

COST

   PRODUCT

  PRICE

  TAX

TAX

TAX

With Tax

UL REG

2.2290

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.7204

PREMIUM

2.3956

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.8870

ULS

2.2920

0.2440

0.3055

0.0019

2.8434

ULS RD

2.2897

0.0000

0.0025

0.0019

2.2941

 

I noticed one of those blue and white circled ‘Evacuation Route’s signs the other day. It looked half hidden by bushes and forgotten. I am older than most of my customers so they may not remember the fifties and early sixties and the imminent threat of cold war. I remember thinking about those Evacuation signs and wondering what good they were. One would have to know where the bomb was going to hit to know which way to evacuate or you could be driving right into the path. At New Hill and the nuclear plant, the signs have some logic. One wants to drive away from the plant.  If the prevailing winds are the deciding factor, as it is in most days, then a plume of radioactivity would probably move North and East toward downtown Raleigh.  One would want to move out of that path.

 

In school, back then, we had  these drills where we were suppose to take cover in case of a nuclear attack. I remember in Martin Junior High they would line us up and march us down into a basement hall. They had these signs on the facing wall that told you what to do. You were supposed to kneel against the a wall away from windows, put your arms over your head, and put your head between your knees. Someone invariably would write below that ‘And kiss your ass goodbye”. What an insane time the Cold War was and I have no wish to return to that time or have my kids endure it. That’s why I think it would be big mistake to try to push all the countries surrounding Russia into NATO: Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia and the big ones like the Ukraine and Georgia. The Russians would go nuts. We need buffer states between our tanks and their tanks. How would we feel in Russia was staging troops along our Canadian border. It drives some people nuts just to picture unarmed Mexicans invading our southern border just to find work.

 

Have a good day,

 

-Larry

You can view gasoline/diesel price changes at any time on our website at www.hopkinsoil.com but you must first Logon to see them

Larry Hopkins

President

Hopkins Oil Co. Inc.

5211 Trademark Drive

Raleigh, N.C. 27610

Direct Line: 919-534-2309

Cell: 919-622-8205

Fax: 919-833-8122

larry@hopkinsoil.com

Gasoline & Diesel Price Changes

 

Good morning,

 

Gasoline prices nudged up today by 2/10ths of a cent. Diesel prices dropped by 5.3 cents. Go figure? Prices today are:

 

AV.RACK

FEDERAL

STATE

SPILL

COST

   PRODUCT

  PRICE

  TAX

TAX

TAX

With Tax

UL REG

2.2012

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.6926

PREMIUM

2.3690

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.8604

ULS

2.2617

0.2440

0.3055

0.0019

2.8131

ULS RD

2.2594

0.0000

0.0025

0.0019

2.2638

 

A couple of notes to cover for some of my newer customers or old ones where the manager might have changed. I used to just give you the Average Rack and one had to insert it into an Excel formula that I provided. The formula changed over the years because of changes in the tax. I came to the conclusion that it would be easier to give you the whole cost with taxes and then you could easily add the margin in your head to the Cost With Tax. Simple. No need for the Excel. I have provided total transparency in the pricing and hope that this will build trust with my customers and, over time, gain their loyalty.

 

Other notes:

When I give the change in gasoline, I always use the UL Reg.

When I give the change in diesel, I am using the ULS.

I use the Average Unbranded Gasoline Price as the base which leaves out he Branded gasolines which are always much higher.

I use the Average rack for diesel.

 

I hope you have a productive day,

 

-Larry H.

 

You can view gasoline/diesel price changes at any time on our website at www.hopkinsoil.com but you must first Logon to see them

Larry Hopkins

President

Hopkins Oil Co. Inc.

5211 Trademark Drive

Raleigh, N.C. 27610

Direct Line: 919-534-2309

Cell: 919-622-8205

Fax: 919-833-8122

larry@hopkinsoil.com

Gasoline & Diesel Fuel Price Changes

 

Good morning,

 

We have another exciting week here in Paradise. Gasoline dropped 4.8 cents at the average rack in Selma. Diesel fuel dropped 2.9 cents. Crude oil is down $2.36 to $80.88 at this time. Prices are:

 

AV.RACK

FEDERAL

STATE

SPILL

COST

   PRODUCT

  PRICE

  TAX

TAX

TAX

With Tax

UL REG

2.1989

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.6903

PREMIUM

2.3718

0.1840

0.3055

0.0019

2.8632

ULS

2.3148

0.2440

0.3055

0.0019

2.8662

ULS RD

2.3123

0.0000

0.0025

0.0019

2.3167

 

 

Have a great week,

 

-Larry H.

 

You can view gasoline/diesel price changes at any time on our website at www.hopkinsoil.com but you must first Logon to see them

Larry Hopkins

President

Hopkins Oil Co. Inc.

5211 Trademark Drive

Raleigh, N.C. 27610

Direct Line: 919-534-2309

Cell: 919-622-8205

Fax: 919-833-8122

larry@hopkinsoil.com